Feminist lies: The myth of gender equality and the working woman

Controversial blog post alert! The last article about my employment situation inspired a new blog topic the subject of which is the title of this post. I’m going to get straight to the point.

What is the Myth?

The myth is that in order for a woman to have any value, she must be gainfully employed. In fact, she should be earning an equal or exceeding income as that of a man.

Where did this Myth Originate?

All myths have origins, so where did this one start?

This myth, in my opinion, is the extension of a CREAMist* agenda. This surreptitious agenda seeks to redefine every part of human life through the lens of the almighty dollar.

While the feminists of the 1960’s fought for equality in the workforce, I do not believe that what Susan B. Anthony was fighting for was for women, who were not interested in or capable of working in positions comparable to those of their husbands or other males in their lives, to be ridiculed for the decision to work in more modest roles, or not at all. I do not believe that all of the 1960’s Civil Rights activists were fighting for the death of the housewife or cultural homogeneity.

I say this, because I come from a family where all of my siblings are college graduates. I have two sisters (a doctor and an engineer) and three brothers (a Physical Therapist, a Chemistry doctoral candidate and a Packaging Engineer). I enjoy writing. However, that does not seem to be an option in the eyes of my family. In their eyes, I should work a full-time job or two saving money towards taking time off to write or writing on weekends and/or evenings towards completing my dream novel.

Am I the ONLY one who sees the BACKWARDS nature of this thinking?

If I want to write, and writing in and of itself (creative writing) is and of itself a skill that adds value to society and should as a matter of fact should be worth money; why shouldn’t I be writing? Especially if it is something I love to do.

Why do I have to defend my decision to do what I love? Why should I defend my desire to be healthy and stress-free instead of risking stress-related illness like depression, anxiety, obesity and cardiovascular disease by slaving away in jobs I hate and working for people who want to wield their appointed authority as a means of expressing repressed aggression because of others who used their own authority to do the same to them in an endless pyramid of oppression?

When did it become a not only acceptable, but a requirement that if you want to live contrary to the dominant culture (the CREAMist culture) you MUST work twice as hard for the “life, liberty and pursuit of happiness” promised by the founding fathers of this country?

When did the mentality become “I’m working a job I hate so I can have three weeks of fun every year, so YOU should too. In fact, YOU BETTER do it, because if you don’t you will be considered a disgrace!”

Now a days, if a woman doesn’t make enough money, she suffers the threat of starvation, homelessness and ridicule. Even if she becomes a housewife or a stay-at-home mother, she stands the risk of being ridiculed or comparably, getting those patronizing comments such as: “Oh, you’re a sta35t796y-at-home-mom? That’s a full-time-job too!” *insert self-assured smile here*.

When did it become unacceptable for women to live the lives they want? When did families stop being supportive of women’s healthy lifestyle choices? When did society stop being supportive of women who choose stress and disease-free lifestyles?

Is this not it’s own form of oppression? Am I the only one who sees that when stripped of the option of a choice…a healthy alternative…the pin-striped pantsuit becomes a Western hijab?!

hijab2

*I will henceforth be using the term CREAMist to refer to what I believe is the current cash-supremicist society. The term CREAMist comes from rap lyrics made popular by the CASH Money Millionaires which says “Cash Rules Everything Around Me. CREAM makes the money. Dolla dolla bills y’all!”

 

Read Next: Flexible Jobs for Women

Author: African Femininity

African Femininity is a first generation American-born Nigerian. That basically means, her parents were immigrants and raised her with a mix of selective cultural values from both traditions. Needless to say, this left her with a very dissonant understanding of what being a “lady” meant. Now, as an un-married 30 year old woman, she is on a mission to delve to the root of being a woman in a world where conflicting cultural values and traditions are leaving many confused and disillusioned. She use the power of the pen to defend a woman’s right to choose her own lifestyle: be it housewife, social climber or being conventionally employed. Check out her Amazon author page for books written by her at http://amazon.com/author/shadowjackson

You may also like

6 Comments

  1. Every woman in my life that works has to work in this economy in order to put their kids through college. They are mostly all married and their husbands share the home duties after work. During the day, kids are at school. There is nothing wrong w/women working. It makes life interesting. I agree that women shouldn’t put off having kids for biological reasons and that trend is changing: most women now marry and start families in their mid to late twenties/early thirties (in vitro accounts for only .25% of all pregnancies so why worry about it at all). Twentieth century technology has made homemaking much less time consuming that it was previously; no one weaves the the material to sew clothes or bake yeast bread from scratch! What are we supposed to do? Sit around and eat bon bons? (Oh wait, that’s a derogatory stereotype of POOR women who don’t work! LOL) I was a homemaker for almost 7 years and enjoyed it but at some point I wanted to work. And a career is simply work that is more satisfying and well paid. Men who are insecure and “have no motivation to take care of their families” because their wife works are probably men who have issues to begin with. My husband didn’t care if I worked or not (he had a good income) and we decided TOGETHER what was best for our family. Freedom to choose is the important thing.

    1. Julie:

      A) That’s fine that you wanted to work after your children got a little older, but the majority of working moms would rather be at home with their children: http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2013/08/19/mothers-and-work-whats-ideal/. B) It is NOT a trend that younger women are giving birth. Births to women ages 35 and older grew 64% between 1990 and 2008, increasing in all major race and ethnic groups: http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2010/05/06/the-new-demography-of-american-motherhood/. C) Women working is nothing new: For thousands of years, it took more than one person to make a farm or business thrive, and so a potential mate’s skills, resources, thrift, and industriousness were valued as highly as personality and attractiveness: http://www.amazon.com/Marriage-History-How-Love-Conquered/dp/014303667X

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *