Why Meryl Streep Turned Her Back on Feminism

21st Annual SAG Awards at the Shrine Auditorium Featuring: Meryl Streep Where: Los Angeles, California, United States When: 25 Jan 2015 Credit: FayesVision/WENN.com

In a recent interview, Meryl Streep was asked if she was a feminist and was quoted as saying, “I am a humanist. I am for nice, easy balance.” She is not the only high-profile female celebrity distancing herself from the controversial ideology of feminism. Susan Sarandon told The Guardian when asked about her affiliation with feminism, “I think of myself as a humanist, because I think it’s less alienating.” Other celebrities have made similar statements in recent times, and feminist extremists, in true form, have aggressively attacked these women for selling out an ideology that supposedly encourages woman’s right to choose. Apparently that right to choose does not include a right to choose your own opinions.

Meryl Streep dressed as a rock star looks sad
Streep in the 2015 movie Ricki & The Flash which realistically portrays the consequences of a woman who chooses a wild life over her family
Credit: Movieclips Trailers (youtube)

Although, I do not agree with a lot of what the online news source The Frisky says, I do agree with writer Rebecca Brink’s , statements on feminism:

“The feminist internet tends to imply that feminism is just a set of beliefs, not a way of behaving or a set of tactics…But no: Feminism is also a way of behaving, a way of living, and a set of tactics…This is true for any ideology or religion – if you want change, you can’t just have beliefs; the point is that you also act on them. This is why Gandhi fasted and Martin Luther King Jr. engaged in non-violence.”

 

Meryl Streep with Alec Bladwin and Steve Martin in movie it's complicated
Meryl Streep has played in her share of feminist propaganda films such as this 2009’s “It’s Complicated” about a high-powered woman who faces the dilemma of juggling a serious relationship and a secret affair with her ex-husband
photo credit: Universal studios

Feminism is an aggressive, unilateral movement, no matter how their supporters try to spin it. A movement towards what, though? Brink, Streep, Sarandon have all distanced themselves from this movement, because (as Brink points out in her article) modern feminism is full of bullying and power grabbing and most of the time does little if anything to support women who are most in need, such as impoverished or abused women. This includes women in third world countries, as well as homeless women and women in poverty here in America, military widows and orphans. Modern feminism lacks the compassion and substance of great successful movements of the past. Instead, it focuses on increasing unhealthy permissiveness for those who don’t need it, such as middle and upper class white women.
Do not get me wrong, I am not saying that middle- and upper-class white women have absolutely no problems deserving of sympathy. However, feminists are forgetting the ultimate impact that their policies have on society’s most vulnerable women. How do low-income women benefit from sexual promiscuity, abortions and male-hating rhetoric? If anything, those women are most in need of male support for their security and legacy in the world. There is no benefit to encouraging underprivileged women to reject the men in their lives when they need that dual income to raise children and support themselves and their families. There is not benefit in the sexual liberation of third world women who primarily need to be concerned with the personal health and welfare of themselves and their families. These are the issues of the feminist elite who are controlling the voice of the feminist movement right now. Fortunately, as Sarandon and Streep are displaying, many of these women are beginning to wise up to the consequences of this divisive and hazardous ideology.
Do you identify as a feminist? Why or why not?

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Author: African Femininity

African Femininity is a first generation American-born Nigerian. That basically means, her parents were immigrants and raised her with a mix of selective cultural values from both traditions. Needless to say, this left her with a very dissonant understanding of what being a “lady” meant. Now, as an un-married 30 year old woman, she is on a mission to delve to the root of being a woman in a world where conflicting cultural values and traditions are leaving many confused and disillusioned. She use the power of the pen to defend a woman’s right to choose her own lifestyle: be it housewife, social climber or being conventionally employed. Check out her Amazon author page for books written by her at http://amazon.com/author/shadowjackson

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3 Comments

  1. This is how I have felt about feminism for a long time. Feminism has been over taken publicly (in the face of the media) by white women. No matter what they say about there being different kinds of feminism, at the end of the day they all call themselves “feminists”. I find it hard to relate to their “issues” and I agree that they seem to have forgotten about lower class women, and women from developing nations.

  2. Unfortunately I don’t think your two examples are good ones. Both Sarandon and Streep are clearly third wave feminists from their statements over the years and believe in victimhood mentality. All this actually shows is their awareness that “feminism” is increasingly a dirty word as a stand in for male hating and female privilege and not helpful label for a movie star.

    A much better example is Cassie Jaye, a feminist documentary maker who released the film The Red Pill in 2016. It is a hard film to easily find because feminists tried hard to shut it down and prevent its release onto cinema screens. The documentary is about Cassie investigating the Men’s rights movement fully expecting to find misogynist men whining about loss of male privilege but instead found reasonable men presenting rational discrimination facts which challenged her feminist upbringing. When she presented the men’s points to prominent feminists all she got were lies and excuses.

    By the end of the documentary she realizes modern feminism is a hateful and deceiving ideology that hides the real truth about men and women and her last words are “I no longer call myself a feminist”. It is coming from a different angle than the points raised in this website but arguably the distorted reality of feminism is much easier to see when you examine how feminism deals with men.

    Modern feminism is a cancer. It hurts women, men, relationships and society at large. Who does not want equality and equal opportunities for all and solid, lasting loving, relationships? but feminism is not the answer.

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