The Worst Role Model

Huma Abedin
Huma Abedin
Huma Abedin

With the U.S. presidential election coming up in a few weeks, much of the world’s attention is focused on learning more about Hillary Clinton. While there’s quite a bit that could be written about Clinton, the Hildabeast that may likely become the first female president of America, I’d like to focus on a more interesting character in the Clinton circle: Huma Abedin, Clinton’s her right-hand woman and professional aide.

Never before have I seen a woman made up of so many contradictions and twisting plotlines. She is so polished and calculating, but made of so many mistakes. On many levels, I am fascinated by Abedin because her life has taken a course that I no interest in following. She is the opposite of a role model. If anything, she serves as a public guideline for how not to live.

The first and foremost mistake that Abedin has made is that she married a scheming, lying sham of a man, named Anthony Weiner. Heard of him? He’s the former New York congressman who was first caught texting another woman (outside of his marriage to Abedin) while running for public office. I originally dismissed the first texting scandal as temporary marital strife in the Weiner home, and none of my personal business. But then, he got caught texting his penis a second time shortly after the incident.

At the time, I thought, it was just bad timing. He probably should have known not to do it again, especially so soon to the first texting incident. He was laughed out of Congress. Then, years later, Weiner attempted to make a comeback by running for mayor of New York City, but was caught sexting other women again! His bid for mayor failed. Then most recently, he was caught texting a photo of his penis to a woman—while his infant son lie on the bed next to him.

Anthony Weiner sexting.
Weiner sexting

Weiner flagrant extramarital affairs were hard to understand. It was even harder to understand why Abedin remained so loyal to him, especially given the negative impact that her association with Weiner could have had on her career. And what kind of person would marry someone as crazy as Weiner in the first place? I can think of two theories: First, she wanted to stay married for her son’s benefit and/or marriage is frowned upon by her family. Second, she may have thought that being faithful and loyal to Weiner will make her look like a hero in the long run, because after all, it worked so well for Hillary after the Bill Clinton affair.

The last theory is the most probable I think, but it’s hard to imagine why someone would stay married to a man who continued to disrespect her. Lastly, Abedin might also be crazy or egomaniacal too, and just wanted to be married to someone powerful. Was it possible that Abedin is just as unstable as Weiner? It turns out that Abedin may have known that he was a bad apple from the very beginning. In an interview, Abedin said that she walked out on Weiner on their first date. And yet, she married him even still.

The second crazy thing about her is her unwavering dedication to Hillary Clinton. I do not want to get on a soapbox about how wrong Clinton is for the country, but I know that anyone who is an ally with her is also probably wrong too. Abedin has testified in court in defense of Clinton, and she even had Clinton preside over her wedding, for goodness sake.

Lastly, Abedin is, in all outward aspects, a very feminine woman. She understands the importance of color-coding and matching, and she makes sure that her hair and makeup looks fantastic on a regular basis. I think it is wonderful that she takes care of herself, but it’s also a bit contradictory that she works in such a cut-throat industry. After all, her work with Clinton at Department of State involved conversations about drone strikes, refugee camps and military interventions. Not so glamorous. Nevertheless, Vogue recognized her many years ago for her sense of fashion, but neglected to discuss the much seedier side of the work that she does everyday.

Abedin may now have it all together in her personal life, but her professional life is most certainly on a steep incline (after all, we know that women can’t really have it all). It is shocking that a woman who made such a poor choice by marrying and staying loyal to Weiner may soon serve as the top aide to the president of the United States. As more and more women turn away from feminism, I hope that they will look to Abedin as an example of how not to live.

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How to Avoid Being Accidentally Childless

Photo by marty hadding via Flickr
Photo by gadgetdude via flickr
Photo by gadgetdude via flickr

If you’re reading this, are you a young woman in high school or your early twenties? Then we can guess that you must also feel empowered to pursue your independence, life goals and career aspirations. The whole world is your oyster! You want to travel, date around, drink til your heart’s content and dance til your feet hurt. Eventually you want to get married and have a family, but you want to leave those heavy topics for much, much later, like maybe for your late thirties or forties when the timing is just right. Life is for living now!

If you agree with any of the above, you have been misled. You have sipped from the reality-rejecting, feminist-propaganda-swindling sippie cup. And, unfortunately, you will not understand that you are confused until you are older and it is often too late to go back. I know this because I used to have the same thoughts. Women in developed nations across the world just like you have been told by older generations of women to pursue own their dreams and goals before getting married, and to avoid settling down at all costs. Feminists have encouraged women through books, lectures and public policies to build their own lives before getting married.

Popular culture shows and films, such as Sex and the City, Ally McBeal, Grey’s Anatomy and Foxy Brown, have glorified the joys of being young, fun and independent women. Every year, the music industry pushes out feel-good “empowered” pop songs, which usually end up being mega hits. For instance, the Destiny’s Child song “Independent Women” held the number one spot on the Billboard Hot 100 chart for eleven consecutive weeks in 2000. And I don’t think I can list all of the Pitbull-esque “live like there’s no tomorrow” hit songs that have been released in the past few decades.

Advertisement: CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT A NATURAL CURE TO INFERTILITY

But for all of the cheers for “strong and empowered” working women, nothing seems to soothe the concerns of middle-aged women who have just realized that they no longer have the option to conceive a child. Women are now waking up to the reality that they made a mistake by prioritizing work (and their independence) ahead of their family goals. In an NPR interview, Barbara Collura, president/CEO of Resolve, the National Infertility Association, sums up the misguided sentiments shared by career women nicely:

“Let’s be honest, women don’t want to hear that they can’t have it all. We can have a great job, we can have a master’s degree, we don’t need to worry about child-bearing because that’s something that will come. And when it doesn’t happen, women are really angry.”

Infertility Graph

Collura says the first thing (infertile) women say is “Why didn’t anybody tell me this?” That’s a good question. One study (pdf) found that women think that the chance of a 30-year-old getting pregnant in one try is 80 percent, while in reality it’s less than 30 percent. For a 40-year-old, many assumed up to a 40 percent success rate. It’s actually less than 10 percent.

Why are so many women confused about fertility? I have a few ideas:

      1. Fertility discussions go against two feminist ideals: First, feminists believe men and women are completely equal androgynous beings (ugh), so any discussion about biological differences is considered disruptive. Second, feminists want to prove that women can and should be as successful as men, and any talk of women slowing down their careers for their families is forbidden.
      2. Any attempt to teach women about fertility has been silenced. Sex education classes in schools only talk about preventing pregnancies, but say nothing about the reality that women will not always be able to get pregnant (and must plan their lives accordingly). Collura says “A decade ago, a campaign by the American Society for Reproductive Medicine sparked a vicious backlash. Ads on public buses in several big cities featured a baby bottle shaped like an hourglass, to warn women their time was running out. But women’s rights groups called it a scare tactic that left women feeling pressured and guilty.”
      3. The media has made the single life look all too good. Shows about single working women are cool, flashy and fashion-forward, while shows about married life are glum and depressing. Husbands are made to look like bumbling idiots on every family TV show.

Thinking about fertility early is important for several reasons. First, women have only so much time to have children. If you wait too long, you may get lucky enough to have one child, but any more than that is unlikely to happen. Second, if you desire to have children, you need to plan for the physical and emotional commitments that go into raising a child (six months of maternity leave will not usually be enough time—plan for taking off several years to bond with your child. This means that you need to select the right spouse). Third, you want to think about fertility because you want to have healthy children. The most common risk factor for Down syndrome is maternal age (read this chart). Fourth, if you wait too long, you might have to face taking care of your teenage children at the same time as you have to care for your aging parents. Yikes. Finally, fertility treatments are expensive (the average cost of a fertility intervention is $25,000) and sometimes unsuccessful.

So what can women do differently today?

First, educate yourself and other women about the importance of thinking about fertility. As psychologist Meg Jay says in her book The Defining Decade: Why your twenties matter—and how to make the most of them now. “Thirty is not the new twenty.” Understand that your fertility drops every year. Teach young women to plan wisely while they are young and fertile.

Second, plan your own life carefully. If you are considering pursuing a new career or starting a new relationship, ask yourself: How many hours will I need to work per week at the peak of my career? If I had to, could I work part-time in my current career field? Does the person I’m dating have the same family goals as me?

It might be helpful for a woman who is switching careers to draw a timeline of the life she wants for herself. For instance, if a woman who is 24 years old, single and wants children is considering going to college, how will she balance graduating from school, getting hired, finding a husband, marrying and giving birth within the next few years? Especially if her goal is to have several children before her fertility sharply declines at 30? Developing a timeline will help young women live the lives they want to live in the future.

Read next: 20 Facts about Sex and Dating Feminists Don’t Want You To Know

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