Tag the Bias

Photo by Jon S NS Newsflas via Flickr
Photo by Jon S NS Newsflas via Flickr
Photo by Jon S NS Newsflas via Flickr

Have you seen these articles?

  • The best way to eliminate the gender pay gap? Ban salary negotiations.
  • Caitlyn Jenner: I was ‘mistreated’ by Kris Jenner
  • Women’s Soccer Is a Feminist Issue
  • The Price of Caitlyn Jenner’s Heroism

This may come as a shock, but each of the article references above came from reputable news outlets (the first two articles were taken from the pages of The Washington Post, the third from The Atlantic and the final article from The New York Times). These news outlets used to be world-renown for their investigative coverage of the country’s most pressing issues, such as government corruption, war crimes, white-collar criminals, gentrification or political astroturfing.

I implore all Ladies Again readers to document bias in the media by using the hashtag #tagthebias.

Instead, today’s journalists at high-profile news agencies are choosing to forgo coverage of hard-hitting news subjects to cover made-up gender issues, such as the “rape culture,” the “sexual harassment in the workplace,” or “pay discrimination” against women―all “issues” that have been debunked by research). Reporters at traditional news outlets are unabashedly using their publications as mouthpieces to push their own ultra-liberal, feminist and pro-gay political agendas. In the mainstream media, opposing views to the liberal agenda are either ignored or categorized as sexist, racist, insensitive or homophobic. Ethical journalism is at an all-time low.

Hillary Clinton Washington Post Express Cover
Hillary Clinton Washington Post Express Cover

If you are a regularly reader of a mainstream news publication, it’s rare that you read a news issue that does not include at least one article that promotes the value of gay marriage, transsexual rights or chastises a political leader or celebrity for making comments about women or dating. And news agencies are pushing their agenda without any shame―in March 2014, Time magazine put a transsexual on the cover of their magazine.

Earlier this year, The Washington Post put Hillary Clinton on the cover with a halo behind her―of course, Rand Paul, Marco Rubio and Ben Carson did not receive the same “halo” treatment when they announced their bids for presidency. Conservative opinions are rarely included by the country’s largest news agencies. The bias in the media extends beyond political leaders—workaholics (and liberals) Sheryl Sandberg and Sonya Sotomayor are praised as “strong” heroines by the press, yet conservative business and political leaders like Penelope Trunk and Condoleezza Rice are not praised for their work ethics.

As a journalist, my question is this: Why are news outlets investing so much energy in promoting fringe feminist ideals or gay rights when the media industry is falling apart? Shouldn’t they worry about covering actual news? The general public does not even agree with their feminist sentiments: In a study, only 24 percent of women and 14 percent of men considered themselves to be a “feminist” in the absence of a definition of the word. Nearly forty percent of all Americans say that they do not support gay marriage.

The media industry cannot afford to continue this nonsense. According to the American Society of News Editors, full-time newspaper newsroom staffing shrunk 30 percent from 2003 through 2012. Local corruption stories are likely not getting covered: A Pew report finds that the number of full-time statehouse reporters dropped by 35 percent between 2003 and 2014—a loss of 164 jobs. News agencies are losing money each day. The New York Times reported in 2014 that their total revenue decreased 0.6 percent, to $388.7 million, from $391 million in the period a year earlier, largely because of a 4.1 percent decline in advertising revenue. Net income decreased from more than $20 million to $9 million in the second quarter of 2013.

Pew Bias Chart
Pew Bias Chart

I am not sure what news agencies are doing, but it is time that the public call out media agencies for wasting valuable print space on liberal fringe ideas. Why? The media has tremendous power in setting cultural guidelines and in shaping political discourse. According to the national media watch group FAIR (Fairness and Accuracy In Reporting), it is essential that news media are challenged to be fair and accurate. According to FAIR, the first step in challenging biased news coverage is documenting bias. FAIR provides a blueprint of questions that the public should ask themselves when they come across newspaper, magazine, television and radio news:

  • Who are the sources?
  • From whose point of view is the news reported?
  • Are there double standards?
  • Do stereotypes skew coverage?
  • What are the unchallenged assumptions?
  • Is the language loaded?
  • Is there a lack of context?
  • Do the headlines and stories match?
  • Are stories on important issues featured prominently?

I implore all Ladies Again readers to document bias in the media by sharing a photo of the news article on Tumblr and Twitter using the hashtag #tagthebias. We’re sharing a few examples below:

In this Post article, men's blog is mentioned in quotations.
In this Post article, men’s blogs are referenced in quotations.
The Post draws attention to Indian feminist protests.
The Post draws attention to Indian feminist protests.
Two (!) feminist news updates from The Washington Post
Two (!) feminist news updates from The Washington Post

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Flexible Jobs for Women

Photo by Geoffery Kehrig via Flickr

We all know that, despite HAM (‘Hating Anti-Male’) calls for more equality in the workplace, studies show that most women do not want to be working at all. In fact, one Pew study found that women do not even want to be the boss. The reason for this is that many smart Red Pill Women understand that making money does not come before loving their spouses and families. There’s ample examples in books and articles of women who gave up their youth, energy and fertility for their jobs.

Photo by Geoffery Kehrig via Flickr
Photo by Geoffery Kehrig via Flickr

After all, who really wants to end up becoming power woman like Erin Callan, the former chief financial officer of the doomed Lehman Brothers, who realized only after the crash and burn of her career that she did not have a life outside of work? Or to realize, at 47 years of age, as she did, that she missed out on her opportunity to have children? Who wants to be Kate Bolick, the writer for The Atlantic who realized at 39 that she might have missed her opportunity to have a family, too?

Here’s the kicker to feminism: You can try to compete with men in the workplace and decide to work overtime to get ahead, but after years of working hard, only men will still have the option to have children (usually with younger, more fertile women) once they get older. As women, we have to prioritize our youth and fertility if we want to have children.

This means that we cannot allow ourselves to lose years of our youth in dead-in relationships (i.e., hookups, one-night stands or any kind of fornicating with bums) or in dead-in, exhausting jobs. Intense rat-race corporate jobs must be off limits because they take so much time away our abilities to date or stay at home with our children. In the book, “The Flipside of Feminism,” authors Suzanne Venker and Phyllis Schlafly argued that a woman’s family life will suffer if she chooses a high-achieving career that involves long hours. She encourages women to reconsider their plans to become doctors, lawyers or business executives.

As part-time and telecommuting work become more common, there are ways for women to find work outside of the office (or away from the Starbucks register). We’ve compiled a list of a few flexible jobs:

  • Web developer/designer
  • Finance manager
  • Software developer
  • Insurance agent
  • Dietitian
  • Real-estate agent
  • Graphic designer
  • Property, real-estate and community-association manager
  • Writer
  • Newspaper reporter
  • Financial analyst
  • Film/Video editor
  • Personal assistant
  • Dog walker

Did we miss any flexible jobs? Share jobs in the comments below.

Read next: I’m a Woman with a Career I Don’t Want

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20 Facts about Sex Feminists Don’t Want You To Know

Women smiling

I just returned from a three-week tour of Central America. While there, I joined members of my group tour in going out to dinner in Rio Dulce, a bay city in Guatemala. At dinner, I had the pleasure of getting to know a young Australian woman,19 years old, on the trip who seemed to have sex, dating and marriage all figured out. She was tall and naturally beautiful, with long brown hair that extended down her back. Despite her young age, she decided that marriage was bullshit and unnecessary (she thought of marriage as a relic from old history), that men actually like opinionated and strong women, and that it was okay to sleep around while you are figuring out life. She was loud, masculine and opinionated; a middle school boy’s fantasy tomboy come to life.

We were both fresh out of failed long-term relationships. She broke up with her boyfriend so she could be free to travel, and I broke up with my long-term boyfriend because he refused to get married. As I sat at the table trying to explain my newfound desires to get married and have children, she shook her head, saying “Life is for living! Don’t be so rigid!”As she spoke, some of the men at the table nodded in agreement. They wanted to enjoy their youth too by hooking up, experimenting and traveling. Nearly everyone at the table (besides the one couple in our group) said that they wanted to settle down and get married in their late thirties or early forties. When they were ready, of course.

I was the odd woman out at the table trying to share some of the knowledge about dating and relationships I learned over the past few years. Knowledge about the declining fertility and beauty of women and about the emotional baggage of useless hookups. But the young Australian did not want to hear it. Eventually, I gave up after I realized that the differences between us―at 26 years old, I was at an age where I am beginning to see the physical consequences of casual sex and careless living.

I have felt the sadness of causal empty sex with hookups and the resulting loneliness. I have friends who are already single parents, unmarried friends who are stuck in rental leases with ex-partners they despise and relatives on the verge of divorce (I myself am actually the product of careless hookup sex―my father was married to another woman when I was born and I am just three months older than one of my brothers). Worst of all, I have female friends over the age of 35 who may have missed their opportunity to get married because they spent their entire youth (when they were at their sexual peak) working overtime at the office to get ahead. These women are the most regretful people I have ever met.

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But to the young Australian, life was for the taking. She is beautiful and her career is on the way up. If she is getting everything she wants now and a constant stream of compliments from men, why should she need to think that someday men will stop finding her attractive? Or that the men at the table will have the opportunity to pick up family life and marriage any time they want (usually with younger women), but that she will not have those options if she waits too long? I dropped the topic because I realized that I was wasting my time.

I also realized with shocking horror that I was talking in real-time to my past self. The Australian girl was me! When I was 19, I would not have listened to my blabbing about fertility and marriage either. Why, I had a career to pursue! There were other women at the table from Western countries (the U.K., Germany, the Netherlands) who shared the young Australian’s sentiments―that marriage was oppressive and restricting, that having a family was not everything and that a woman’s independence and career should come first. I felt sickened at that moment with feminism’s ability to to defy not just logic but also geographical barriers. That flawed ideology has spread across the world, infecting young women by tricking them into believing that they can have everything―the loyal, attractive husband, the high-flying career, loving and stable children―all without having to lose anything in return, like fertility, independence or femininity. Lies! All of it lies!

If I could go back to my younger self, I would share all of the facts that paint a different picture about female independence, love and marriage:

Fertility is More Relevant Than Your Bullshit Career

  • After 25, female fertility slowly drops off. After 30, the decline in fertility begins to hasten. By 35, difficulty in conceiving children is commonplace and accounts for the boom in fertility clinics. By 40 you are playing Russian roulette.
  • One in five men who remarry wed a woman at least 10 years their junior, according to a Pew Research Center analysis of Census data. By contrast, only one in 20 men on their first marriage pair up with someone that young.
  • While 80 percent of men in their first marriages have spouses within five years of their age, that share drops to 57 percent by the second marriage.
  • Men across the age spectrum have a sexual preference for women in their mid-20s. This remains true for men of all ages—men in their early-20s or younger are attracted to women older than themselves and older men are attracted to younger women.

Hookup Sex is Terrible

  • In one study, among participants who were asked to characterize the morning after a hookup, 82 percent of men and 57 percent of women were generally glad they had done it. Forty-three percent of women regretted it! [Thanks to Hooking Up Smart for finding the statistics]
  • In a sample of 507 undergraduate students, more women than men hoped that a relationship would develop following a hookup. Only 4.4 percent of men and 8.2 percent of women (6.45 percent of participants) expected a traditional romantic relationship as an outcome, while 29 percent of men and 42.9 percent of women (36.57 percent of participants) ideally wanted such an outcome (Garcia & Reiber, 2008).
  • Twelve percent of women say that it is sometimes easier to have sex with a guy they don’t know than to make conversation (Glenn, Norval and Marquardt, Elizabeth, 2001).
  • In a study of 832 college students, 26 percent of women and 50 percent of men reported feeling positive after a hookup, and 49 percent of women and 26 percent of men reported a negative reaction.
  • In a qualitative study that asked 187 participants to report their feelings after a typical hookup, 35 percent reported feeling regretful or disappointed, 27 percent good or happy, 20 percent satisfied, 11 percent confused, 9 percent proud, 7 percent excited or nervous, 5 percent uncomfortable, and 2 percent desirable or wanted (Paul & Hayes, 2002).
  • In a large Web-based study of 1,468 undergraduate students, participants reported a variety of consequences: 27.1 percent felt embarrassed, 24.7 percent reported emotional difficulties, 20.8 percent experienced loss of respect, and 10 percent reported difficulties with a steady partner (Lewis et al., 2011).
  • In another recent study conducted on a sample of 200 undergraduate students in Canada, 78 percent of women and 72 percent of men who had uncommitted sex (including vaginal, anal, and/or oral sex) reported a history of experiencing regret following such an encounter (Fisher et al., 2012).
  • In a study of 270 sexually active college-age students, 72 percent regretted at least one instance of previous sexual activity (Oswalt, Cameron, & Koob, 2005).
  • In a report of 152 female undergraduate students, 74 percent had either a few or some regrets from uncommitted sex: 61 percent had a few regrets, 23 percent had no regrets, 13 percent had some regrets and 3 percent had many regrets (Eshbaugh & Gute, 2008).
  • In a study of 140 (109 female, 31 male) first-semester undergraduates, women, but not men, who had engaged in intercourse during a hookup showed higher rates of mental distress (Fielder & Carey, 2010).

He Does Not Like You Just Because He Has Sex with You

  • He is going to ejaculate, whether he likes you or not: Men reached orgasm more often than women. In first-time hookups, 31 percent of men and 10 percent of women reached orgasm; in last relationship sexual activity, 85 percent of men and 68 percent of women reached orgasm.
  • Armstrong, England and Fogarty (2009) addressed sexual satisfaction in a large study of online survey responses from 12,295 undergraduates from 17 different colleges. Participants were asked about oral sex rates and orgasm in their most recent hookup and most recent relationship sexual event. In this study, men reported receiving oral sex both in hookups and in relationships much more than women.
  • In first-time hookups that involved oral sex, 55 percent included only men receiving oral sex, 19 percent only women receiving oral sex, and 27 percent both mutually receiving; in last relationship sexual activity, 32 percent included only men receiving oral sex, 16 percent included only women receiving oral sex, and 52 percent included both mutually receiving.

Independent Women are Lonely Women

  • People with higher numbers of past sexual partners were more likely to form hookups, and to report lower relationship quality. Through the acquisition of partners they begin to favor short-term relationships and find the long-term ones less rewarding. (Paik)
  • A third of unmarried women have not had sex in the past year, compared with less about a quarter of the men. About 20 percent of single women have sex two or more times per week.

Your Career is Not Everything

  • According to Pew, a strong majority of working moms (62%) would rather work part time; a job situation enjoyed by just 26% of working mothers. Over a decade ago, just 48% of working mothers said a part-time job would be ideal.
  • Fully 79% of working fathers prefer to work full time, while just 21% say part-time employment would be ideal

Divorce is a Mistake

  • You can get the divorce if you want to, but there are consequences. Fully 64 percent of divorced or widowed men have remarried, compared with 52 percent of previously married women. (Pew)

In closing, here’s great advice from blogger Susan Walsh that I learned the hard way:

“When a man shows interest he won’t know right away whether you go into the short-term box or the long-term box. If you’re looking for a serious relationship, being very selective about sex is one way of ensuring you’re perceived as potential [long-term relationship] material. Signaling your willingness to have sex immediately with a man you just met says that you are not particularly selective, so there is nothing special about this man. You’re also signaling that there is nothing very special about sex. It’s the fastest route to “one and done.”

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